Why Screen for Gambling Disorder?

  • Gambling Disorder leads to financial, emotional, social, occupational, and physical harms.
  • Gambling Disorder affects about 1% of the general population, and subclinical past year gambling-related problems affect 2 – 3% of the general population.
  • As much as 10% of primary care patients report lifetime Gambling Disorder, and an additional 5% report lifetime subclinical problems.
  • People with gambling-related problems are more likely to smoke, consume excessive amounts of caffeine, have more emergency department visits, and be obese.
  • Although nearly 50% of people who have gambling problems are in treatment for “something,” national studies have failed to identify anyone who currently reports being in treatment specifically for gambling-related problems.
  • Many cases of Gambling Disorder go undetected, due to limited assessment for this problem.

Who Should Screen for Gambling Disorder?

  • Addiction service providers
  • Mental health service providers
  • Physicians (e.g., primary care and emergency medicine)
  • Gerontologists
  • Pediatricians
  • Educators
  • Youth community leaders
  • Employee Assistance Plan service providers
  • Veterans groups

What Should Happen at Gambling Disorder Screening?

  • Complete a brief Gambling Disorder screen
  • Discuss the results of a positive screen with a health provider
  • Learn where to go for additional help and to access other resources, if necessary
  • Receive educational materials on Gambling Disorder

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