Continuing Education at Harvard Medical School

The Division uses addiction research to build innovative continuing education (CE) courses for a diverse set of learners. Some objectives of the Division’s CE program are:

  • Provide cutting-edge research and evidence-based treatment strategies
  • Apply best practices for addiction treatment
  • Discuss strategies to manage new addiction treatment challenges
  • Examine multiple expressions of addiction and co-occurring disorders
  • Facilitate clinical discourse about addictive behavior
  • Improve the quality of addiction treatment across professions and populations

To date, the Division has students from 113 countries.

The Division’s CE program is reflects our mission to alleviate addiction-related social, medical, and economic burdens through research, education, outreach, and training. We currently offer the following CE courses through the Harvard Medical School Department of Continuing Education:

  • Addiction Medicine, a live course held annually during September/October, imparts useful information on practical methods of diagnosis, intervention, and management of patients with substance abuse problems. This program has included presentations about the basic science of addiction medicine, treatment of withdrawal, and treatment of pain for the patient with addiction. This course is designed for primary health care providers, allied health professionals, social workers, counselors, and more. This course awards credit for Continuing Medical Education and it is co-sponsored by the Division on Addiction and Children’s Hospital Boston. Course Directors: John R. Knight, MD, Howard J. Shaffer, PhD, CAS, and Debi A. LaPlante, PhD, and Heather M. Gray, PhD. Please visit the Harvard Medical School Continuing Medical Education website for more information.
  • Addiction in Your Practice: Information and Resources for Dealing with Addictive Behavior focuses on addictive behavior and psychiatric comorbidity — a commonly observed circumstance that influences treatment settings and has far-reaching consequences. When ignored, complications can impede treatment progress, lead to additional problems, and increase the chance of treatment failure. Consequently, recently there has been increased demand on medical care workers who do not specialize in addiction (e.g., nurse practitioners, general practitioners, obstetricians, trauma specialists, etc.) to assess, intervene, and provide referrals for their patients who demonstrate addictive behavior. However, research suggests that many medical care providers lack addiction-related training and resources. The goals of this online course are to improve participants’ understanding of addiction and its influence on medical care. This course provides an opportunity to discuss the theoretical and clinical aspects of addictive behavior, as well as strategies for dealing with patients who demonstrate addictive behavior. To learn more about the course, or to register, click here.
  • Gambling Disorder in Your Practice: Information and Resources is an online course dedicated to increasing providers’ understanding of disordered gambling and its importance to their practice. This course includes information about the epidemiology and clinical features of disordered gambling and details options for the primary care provider with regard to screening of and referral for gambling-related problems. Additionally, the course includes specific learning objectives related to the screening and treatment of disordered gambling and takes a case-based approach, including multiple choice questions, high-quality images, interactive modules, an individualized study guide, and a list of references. To learn more about the course, or to register, click here.
  • Research Methods 101 for the Provider: A Guide to Critical Research Consumption is an online course dedicated to increasing providers’ understanding of research methods in clinical settings. The primary goal of this course is to provide participants with the tools necessary to be critical consumers of research and (if desired) begin to design their own research. By the end of the course, participants will be able to critically evaluate empirical research, identify critical components and potential pitfalls of research designs, and determine the appropriate research design for a given research question. The course takes a case-based approach, including multiple choice questions, high-quality images, interactive modules, an individualized study guide, and a list of references. To learn more about the course, or to register, click here.